Inside Stout

Inside Stout Ep. 16 - Let’s Talk Senior Show: Art and Design

May 04, 2022 UW-Stout Marketing Communications Season 1 Episode 16
Inside Stout
Inside Stout Ep. 16 - Let’s Talk Senior Show: Art and Design
Show Notes Transcript

This week, let's talk about senior shows! As the spring semester draws to a close, Rachel and Emily highlight senior projects happening within the School of Art & Design (SOAD). Graphic Design major Rhea Losano and Game Design major Eleanore Falck discuss their senior projects, why they chose UW-Stout, and offer advice to those considering a future in the design field.

Interested in SOAD?
Learn More About the School of Art & Design
Learn More About the Game Design and Interat Program
Learn More About the Graphic Design and Development Program



Co-Hosts:
Rachel Hallgrimson
Emily Laird




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Speaker 1:

Hello, everyone. Welcome to inside stout, a UW stout podcast that focuses on the stories of students, faculty, staff, and the entire campus

Speaker 2:

Community. I am

Speaker 1:

Emily lair

Speaker 3:

And I'm Rachel Hogenson on this week's episode of inside stout. We're joined by two seniors in the midst of preparing for their senior projects. You'll hear about their journey to stout , why they chose their programs, how it's shaped them and what they're looking forward to after their upcoming graduation. Let's get to it.

Speaker 2:

I wanna thank both our guests for joining us today. So without further ado, let's have you introduce yourself.

Speaker 4:

Hey guys, I'm Rio . Lasano . I'm a graphic design major here at stout graduated in about three weeks. So I'm really excited about that. Uh , favorite breakfast food. It's probably gonna be a breakfast burrito with sausage or a nice big omelet.

Speaker 2:

That is a good answer

Speaker 4:

Or cold pizza, depending on

Speaker 2:

Okay .

Speaker 3:

Very nice

Speaker 2:

Free options . Do didn't even think about that, but like, absolutely.

Speaker 5:

<laugh> hi , uh , I'm Eleanor Falk and I am a senior currently in the game design and development art program at step . And I'll also be graduating in three weeks. And , um, my favorite breakfast food is probably like all of them. Like I love like pancakes and waffles. Yeah . Berries and sausage and maple syrup. It's all delicious.

Speaker 2:

<laugh> I know. I feel like you can't go wrong with breakfast. I'm eggs all the way. All day, every day . If someone's like you want eggs? I'm like anytime , anywhere on a plane, on a train at like we getting where , so she

Speaker 3:

Does talk about eggs

Speaker 2:

A lot, a lot. It's an obsession. Um , that's good. So thank you both again for joining us.

Speaker 3:

Wait, I wanna say mine. Oh

Speaker 2:

My gosh. I'm so sorry.

Speaker 3:

<laugh> it's okay . Mine is definitely anything with bacon. Anything with bacon? Absolutely . It could be eggs. It could be toast.

Speaker 2:

How did we sleep on bacon? I don't

Speaker 3:

Know . I don't know either. I mean, bacon could be on , on the cold pizza or on the omelet .

Speaker 2:

I didn't even think about that.

Speaker 3:

Anything with bacon and cheese?

Speaker 4:

Oh yeah. Yeah . Gotta have the cheese

Speaker 2:

Clearly with eggs.

Speaker 3:

Okay. Now we can begin. <laugh>

Speaker 2:

Okay . I'm glad we got that out. So obviously we wanna talk about breakfast. That's important. What I'm really interested in to kick this office. How did you end up at UW stout ?

Speaker 4:

Yeah. Um, Maria here. So my mom actually went here for hospitality and restaurant management. So that was a few decades ago. I won't date her, but <laugh> So yeah, she went here. Um , and then when she graduated, she moved out to Hawaii and then long story short, she hired my dad. They worked in the restaurant together and they came back to the twin cities. So I grew up in the twin cities , um, grew up with my father. He was a stay at home dad for about 12 years. And he's an artistically inclined in multiple different ways. So musically he's , um, a chef as well, so culinary and then also traditional art. So I knew I always wanted to do something with art. And then obviously I can't have a 401k, solid income PTO and all that, which is painting all day mm-hmm <affirmative>. So I got a little realistic with myself after I graduated high school, did some like community college and then just took some time off to save some money. And then I was like, all right , let's look into some design schools . So obviously stout was on my radar cuz my mom went there. Um , MCAT is also another one in Minneapolis mm-hmm <affirmative> and I was kind of toying between. And then also the university of Minnesota also has a really good program. So debating between all those three, I applied and then I actually got accepted to stout first and I was like, let's just run with it. And yeah, I've been here for about five years now.

Speaker 2:

That's awesome. Yeah.

Speaker 4:

Had to run with that design and art. I love it.

Speaker 2:

I love , love that story. I love that your mom went to stout , right ? There's that connection. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

But then your dad was the one that like inspired you yeah . In the trade.

Speaker 4:

Absolutely. Yep .

Speaker 2:

Very cool . Do you find that your artistic styling is similar to your father's?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, it is. Um, just with growing up with the traditional aspect, I had to learn all the digital side in school here. So I came into like drawing and painting and like those fundamental classes, like very confident, cause we were doing a lot of that. So like the painting and the color pencils, markers and all that. But then when it came down to the digital side of things, it was like, whoa, this is definitely why I came to school. Cause I don't know anything about this. So I'm definitely more confident in the traditional side of things. That's awesome. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Eleanor, how did you end up at UW stop ?

Speaker 5:

My story is maybe like a little less cool. That was really cool. <laugh> Um , yeah, like I knew in high school that I wanted to do, like something , uh , artistic, like my freshman year of high school, I was like, I'm gonna be a dress maker . And then I was like, nobody's gonna wear the stuff that I would design . Um , so maybe I'll go into like games or animation and then get to make like wacky stuff. Um, so that was my initial reasoning <laugh> um, but yeah, so then I was like looking around for , um, different schools and I toured a few, I toured , um, like SVA and New York and a school in like Burlington and then wow . Um , and I heard stout had game design and development. And so I was like, there's not a lot of, I mean, there's like no other schools in the area basically that have that. And so I came here , um , and at first I was like, oh, I really wanna go to like Vermont. And then I came here and I was like, it's so hard to decide. Um, but ultimately I , uh , I got accepted to uh , two different schools and I decided to come here cuz it was just closer to my family. I didn't have to move away. I could still drive to see them and also , uh , fit my budget a lot better. Mm-hmm <affirmative> um , so yeah. Now here I am.

Speaker 2:

That's amazing. I have to ask a follow up . What type of apparel design were you into just in doing that? You said no one is gonna wanna wear this.

Speaker 5:

Uh , it was just like a lot of fantasy type things or like really elaborate stuff. I was like,

Speaker 3:

Like costume making mm-hmm

Speaker 5:

<affirmative> yeah, kind of. I was like maybe theater. Would've been a different avenue .

Speaker 2:

Yeah .

Speaker 5:

Yeah . But um, I don't know . I'm not, I don't even like do characters anymore. I'm like, I don't like anatomy <laugh> oh totally. I'm an environment artist now. And so , um , that sewing and um , fashion design didn't really go anywhere for me , but it's still fun.

Speaker 3:

Well it's okay. I'm glad that you're both here now.

Speaker 4:

Me too.

Speaker 3:

So you're coming up on your senior shows, which I'm sure you're both very proud of the work that you've done for those. And like getting to this point, I was curious, thinking about who you were when you were a first year student and then now what's different about you now than I love that question. When , when you came I'm I'm I'm so

Speaker 2:

Excited to

Speaker 5:

Hear those

Speaker 3:

Answers . Yeah. Just, I mean that could be because of things you've learned in the classroom and outside the classroom. So I was just curious

Speaker 4:

For me, I would say that I am a lot more confident in myself when it comes to like advocating for my own, but also on the other hand, confident in myself and my skills that like when I do receive that constructive criticism, that it's not about me personally. It's about the project at hand. So mm-hmm <affirmative> I feel like working that mindset into these past couple years has been huge for me as a designer, just because mm-hmm <affirmative> that constructive criticism is what takes you to that next level with the project. So I think just being more open with that as the years have progressed has made me a better designer at the end of the day, which might seem a little like obvious. But I think that's a huge part, especially with designers, regardless it's graphic design or game design. Like you have to be okay with hearing the opposite opinion or something different and yeah , that makes you stronger as a person, I think all around.

Speaker 3:

I did hear one that, and I completely agree. And it supports what you just said that when you create something it's, it's not a part of you anymore. Right? Like you might have certain ties to it cuz it might be maybe your favorite piece of work you've ever done. Mm-hmm <affirmative> for whatever reasons, but whatever people think about that, it's not about you it's about the artwork and or whatever it is. And I really appreciated that because I don't think work is life. I don't think my job is my whole life. Right. It's just a part of it. Mm-hmm <affirmative> and so if something happens at work, it's not gonna ruin my entire life. Exactly. So that guards you from that, right ? Both of you from that mm-hmm <affirmative>

Speaker 2:

Do you find that you both have experienced that as you're both creators, right. Do you, and I do wanna ele hear your response too, but kind of as a little tangent on that, do you feel like when you create something it's hard to sometimes sever that, that it's, it's something you did, so it's you? Yeah.

Speaker 5:

Um, sometimes it's difficult. Like I guess if like the subject matter is like, this is a thing that I really like and somebody else could be like, I don't like this type of game and I'm like, well I do <laugh> . Yeah. Um, but in terms of like artistic quality and um, like the design of something, I'm usually pretty like, yeah, let's tear it apart. Let's see. Like how can I make this better? I like that personally.

Speaker 2:

What about you ?

Speaker 4:

I feel like it's hard. It's, it's kind of a , both sides of the coin, you know? So I feel like as graphic designers, we have to focus on aesthetics and color and like the foundations, I , we learn in like art school, but we're also problem solvers. So it goes more than just like making something look pretty. We have to solve a problem. So whether it's a sign or a logo or whatever, like I usually look at things as like problem with the solution kind of thing. That's

Speaker 2:

Excellent. I love that outlook. So Eleanor, how have you changed?

Speaker 5:

I would agree that I've also become like a lot more confident over the years. Um , and I think I've just gotten better at , um, I guess like looking out like beyond stout as well. Cause when I was a freshman, I came in and I'm like, wow, this school is like big. Uh , but then , um , I started to even look like beyond stout , um, for like meeting other people in like the game development community. Um, and really just trying to absorb as much as I could , um, about game development. And so like, I think from like learning from my professors and my peers and then also like reaching out , um, into just like the whole world, I guess. Um, and learning from everyone made me just better at talking to people and made me like more knowledgeable. Um, so I'm proud of that change in myself. Definitely .

Speaker 3:

I wanna hear about your projects, your senior projects. So both very different, but a lot of I'm, but a lot of it will sound similar as far as design goes, cuz design is in the name of your major, but R tell us about your senior project.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, definitely. So our, basically our project brief is very broad. So come up with whatever you want. However, the campaign, the project has to inspire and it has to be something that is gonna be relevant to, to a lot of people. Um, and obviously more than just ourselves. So my project is kind of a big topic. Um, my project is called beacon sobriety lighthouse. So it's a platform that's gonna be established for anybody. That's either looking to work towards their sobriety. Um, anybody that is dealing with a loved one or friend dealing with addiction that would like to help them or , um , what's gonna make my platform a little bit different is taking the stigma out of drug use. So not necessarily being addicted to drugs, but using drugs in a safe way. Um, I feel like there's a very fine line between drug experimentation and then drug addiction. So I think by embracing the reality that people are gonna use drugs and whether it's the party scene where someone's using drugs at a concert or someone that's binge drinking in college and doesn't even know it. So it's gonna kind of be like a bigger platform for people, but it's essentially gonna be an app. Um, you choose and kind of tailor the app to the platform that you need. So whether it's the sobriety tracker , um , the live chat sponsor, or it's gonna be like an alert system. So like you're at Coachella or Lollapalooza or some big event and there is a drug overdose and that's gonna be like sent out through this whole platform in the, with the people in the area. So, okay . And we have to also implement artificial intelligence in our project in some way, shape or form. So I'm gonna be using AI to help categorize those situations. So anything from finding harm reduction tools to clinics, to AA meetings, NA meetings. So basically a platform for sobriety and working towards not using drugs in a unsafe way.

Speaker 3:

All right . That is a big topic. It's

Speaker 4:

A very big topic. And I feel like we've all been affected by addiction in some way, shape or form, whether it's a loved one ourselves or whatever. So just kind of planning the seed to stop that stigma, I think is huge.

Speaker 3:

What percentage out of a hundred are you done with the project right now?

Speaker 4:

Ooh , I'm gonna put myself at 70%. So I'm, I've finally refined my concepts after four or five concepts to one. Okay . That's working and I feel passionate about it and that's a huge thing. So like feeling passionate about your design, that's how you run with it. So I finally hone that in, I've gotten my posters all figured out my business card. So basically it's just more of the digital side and creating the app now. So I wanna put myself at that 70% me . Yeah. I just ordered my knee on sign of my logo. So that's gonna be really cool. See your show .

Speaker 2:

Yeah . I'm so excited. We have to go see

Speaker 3:

This. I'll be there.

Speaker 4:

I'll be guys an invite too ,

Speaker 2:

Please. I would love that. Absolutely. I would absolutely love that. And I wanna tell you that you were talking about your senior project and I'm just in awe and I'm just, I'm in awe by the fact that you chose that, like Rachel said, how it's so amazing when you pick something you're passionate toward and how that passion just drives you and the end product is gonna be so incredible. I'm just so amazed by stout students in general and how I've been to some senior shows. And I am always shocked and amazed by how incredible you guys are able to connect art in life. Yeah. Right. And make your art meaningful and usable in this just incredible impactful way and how relevant and I, I just think that is just phenomenal. So congrats to you. That sounds amazing.

Speaker 4:

Thank you so much.

Speaker 2:

You're welcome. Eleanor Wawa .

Speaker 5:

<laugh> well, I'm not sure. It's like as 100% connected to real life. Um, but my senior project , um , is a kind of a collaboration between like eight different students. So I'm on a team with other game developers at stout and we have , um , four programmers and four artists and are making a game called the witches garden, which is like a casual farming SIM game. Um, so the goal of it is to like be you relaxing and fun and like cute and enjoyable. Uh , but then there's also like some deeper , um , strategy to it for players who , um, maybe play games more than like the casual audience and like wanna really like, think about like what they're doing and like strategize and all that. Um, so yeah, that's my project . That's

Speaker 2:

Awesome. That is great.

Speaker 3:

I like the phrase casual farming. I do. I love it . Oh , what are your hobbies? Casual?

Speaker 2:

<laugh> tell people that I'm not, I do . I'm a casual farmer.

Speaker 3:

I have one chicken.

Speaker 2:

Yeah .

Speaker 3:

It's a casual singular .

Speaker 2:

Yeah. It literally means I go to the farmer's market. <laugh> that was literally a casual farmer for me. That's amazing. So

Speaker 3:

Your role, explain that a bit more, cuz I, I think with R we can kind of picture all the things that she's doing because she's kind of doing all of the end of product mm-hmm <affirmative> whereas you fit within a team. So like talk a little bit about the team dynamic and then what you are doing and like where you kind of fit in the process.

Speaker 5:

Yeah. Um, so I am our art lead. Um, so I didn't come up with like the pitch for the game, cause like at the start of class , um, and like the very beginning of the year, everybody pitches a game and then we kinda like vote on them in different rounds. Um, so my friends game got chosen, but I actually like pitched a game that was really similar. Like we both wanted like kind of a casual, like farming. Cute .

Speaker 3:

Your is more formal farming, wasn't it?

Speaker 5:

Yeah , no, it was actually like cooking

Speaker 3:

<laugh> .

Speaker 5:

Um , but, but yeah, so , uh , we kind of like talk amongst ourselves and like decide roles. And so , uh , I was decided that I was gonna be the art lead. And so , uh , what I do is art lead is kind , um , help all of the artists, including myself, like stay on track to like have , um, it's like maintain a , um, I totally forgot the word I'm looking for maintain a similar style, a consistent style <laugh> so yeah, as the art lead, I , uh , help the team maintain a consistent art. Um , I set up like guidelines at the start , um, did some research on like different games. And I was like , uh , for our game we kind of want like , uh , a game that looks like this and then like find some examples mm-hmm <affirmative> so that I can like help communicate. And then like during class, every day , um, we do like stand up , um, at the start of our meet . So like will everyone will like go around in a circle and be like, what did you do today? Or like since last class. Yeah . So that like we're all on the same page. Um, and then afterwards, like , um, I'll check in with the other artists and um, I'll just like maybe do a paint over of their work , um, to be like, oh, this looks good, but for our game, like maybe we want to like slightly more in this direction to stay like in our continuous style. Um, and yeah, it's a lot of fun. I really like working on a team cuz you can just make something that's like so much bigger than like just what you could accomplish by yourself and like not no one game developer like has like all of the skills, like you really need a team and like people you can depend on. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

I'm curious from both of you, if you were speaking to an undergraduate or not an undergraduate, a high school and you were trying to tell them why they should choose this program, what would you say to them as far as sort of the highlights that you're looking back on? Why, why come to stout ? Why pick this program here?

Speaker 4:

Yeah. Um, I would say for me personally paying for my own school , um, that was the biggest drive. So the cost effectiveness of stout in comparison to the other schools, like I mentioned. Sure . Um, I think part of the reason why I'm a little bit non-traditional is that I'm 26 years old. So I waited to go back to school after I've really figured out what I wanted. And I think that's the biggest advice that I would give to somebody. Yeah . Or regardless of where they're choosing, but especially here at stout out, like the professors are ready for you. The , the people are here for you. The programs are here for you, but you have to be passionate about it or else you're not gonna make it in this program. And I know that sounds a little harsh, but like the professors know like who's gonna make it and who's kind of not. And like if you put your, put your efforts in, they'll see that. But I think the biggest thing is to actually decide that art and design is what wanna be doing.

Speaker 2:

I love that honesty.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. I do hear that from a lot of students that transfer out. Yep . And they just, not that, sorry, you can't be an artist. You're not very good. It's not like they're saying that. Right. It's they're saying you're not willing to put in the work to learn the foundation. Right . Even though it's super boring to draw still lives and it's super boring to like draw little weird stuff in little squares and it makes up a bigger pick , like yeah , people don't wanna do the grunt work to then get to the stuff that

Speaker 4:

Right .

Speaker 3:

Is probably a little bit more fulfilling yeah. In , you know, depending on yield that or concentration. So

Speaker 4:

I agree. Absolutely.

Speaker 5:

I a hundred percent agree that like, you just really need the passion to like, not only work hard in class, but you have to go home and be like, all right , now I learn these things in class. What can I go learn online to like , uh , double my skills , um, or like get even better? Um, some stuff that I, that does that I really like is that , um, they do try to like mimic , um, how actual like game development works. So , um, they set us up in like to work on , uh , games in teams like starting. Um , I took , um , our first game design class, like my first semester here. And so I worked on a team and we , um, would like decide upon like tasks , um, that you do. And like, so in capstone , um, currently right now , um, at the, we, we use like what's called agile development and so oh yeah, yeah. Yep . So yeah, it's , it's like , um, deciding what you like, what the next features are gonna be, or like what you need kind of as you go, instead of deciding everything all at once in the beginning, because you never really know like how your game is going to evolve. So like that's very realistic. Um, the , and just like the way that we structure things in our classes , uh , team wise is like decently realistic. Um, so I really like that. And then I also really like at the end of every semester , uh , we have the style game expo , which has not been in person for several years, but it is gonna be in person this year. And it was really awesome when it was in person. Um, and that's also like something that stout has done. So they mimic what is like normal or like what's going on in like the current game industry is like having an expo. And then you get the experience of like showing your game and talking about your game to people, which is also like an important skill to learn.

Speaker 3:

I figure it might be worth it before we close the show for you to hype up some of your peers projects and they could be from outside of your, your focus too. Like if, you know, have an industrial design or interior that you wanna hype up and just share a cool thing that they're doing. Yeah. Does anything to mind?

Speaker 4:

Yeah. I am gonna hype up my girl cap El Kilion. She is my right hand , man . Her and I are actually the art curators for our show. So we're the cool directors behind it. She's a president and I'm her vice president, but yeah, she is focusing on , uh , really cool. It's kind of the app and website development, but uh , her concept is called stranger danger. So it's basically taking the, the words that we've all grown up with, like string and danger and twisting it. So it's gonna be a platform for you to meet people , um , whether you are looking for friends, a romantic connection or a networking situation. So it's not like your Tinder. It's not like you're Bumble. It's a little bit different than that, but yeah, no, she's been putting the work in and she's one of my biggest inspirations and yeah. I just like to give her a little shout out cuz she's amazing. Cool. I

Speaker 2:

And stranger day .

Speaker 4:

Yeah, you gotta , you close see , like you can use it to make friends. Yeah. So it's gonna be, yeah. And it's also kind of finding yourself too. So she's curated this book that goes along with the program that you kind of go through with levels. So I'm not gonna say too much about it cause I want you guys to come and see it, but oh my gosh . She really am. Yeah . Perfect. She's she's amazing.

Speaker 2:

Okay. Hey, <laugh> Eleanor.

Speaker 5:

Oh , so in terms of like projects that I think are really cool going on, obviously like all of the other capstone games , um , we had like a senior play test night , um, the other week and I got to like kind of see where everybody is at. Yeah. Um, and so like my , some of my friends are working on like new and WVA warriors. Um, and they're both like really fun , uh , games to play. Um,

Speaker 3:

Newt . Yeah . Wait the lizard

Speaker 5:

Like the lizard , um , you like, you it's like , um, it's like a single player game, but there's like two characters. And so like , um, you can either be like this girl or a new and then like they're like buddies and then like the Newt can also transform into objects. You can like solve puzzles. Um , which is, which is fun. Cuz you can like, I it's cool. <laugh>

Speaker 4:

I think I've seen the branding around applied arts for that. Isn't it just very simplistic.

Speaker 5:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Yeah .

Speaker 4:

Oh just like one little lizard guy on a poster that's

Speaker 2:

Mm-hmm <affirmative> yep . I've seen check it out. <laugh>

Speaker 5:

Yeah, he was super cute. Um , so yeah, I dunno . I just love being able to like work with my friends , um, on stuff. Even if we're not like working on a team, we can always just like chat about our games that we're working on and like hype each other up . It's really awesome. Mm-hmm <affirmative>

Speaker 3:

Okay. Before we close , I want you each to share one thing that you've learned out of your however many years here. One thing could be about school, about life could be about graphic design or game design.

Speaker 2:

Tell me, or one thing, you know ,

Speaker 4:

Can it be like a two parter, but like one thing that kind of goes hand in hand . Yeah. Okay . There's no rules. All right . Okay. So I would say network and advocate for yourself. Okay. That kind of goes hand in hand . So by networking, you're advocating for yourself by getting your name out there and all that. And just how important that is. I feel like in our industry, regardless of what your concentration is, is getting your name out there and showing people, you also have the personality behind the skill set .

Speaker 3:

Yeah. I love that. And even though you might be young people in the industry mm-hmm <affirmative> um , someday you won't be, but it starts now. Right. So even if you feel like an, you have imposter syndrome, which I just like to say it's real, but it's also not real.

Speaker 4:

It's so real. You know what

Speaker 3:

I mean? But it's like, but your talent and skills are still existing at the same time. You're thinking you're an imposter. So like how does that make any sense? Right. You know, so just remember that, you know what you're talking about mm-hmm <affirmative> and we can't read people minds . Right. So yeah. Love that. What about you Eleanor?

Speaker 5:

Uh , I, 100% agree with like networking. You like you must network. I don't think I'd be like anywhere without my network. Um , but I think the thing that my , my personal art motto is , uh , do everything three times. Yeah . Like if you do it one time and you're like , uh it's okay. Do it again. And then if you're still like, eh , just keep going and do it again. Like don't just like, I don't know, start something and be like, this is good enough. Like perfect. <laugh>

Speaker 3:

That's excellent. That

Speaker 2:

Is excellent.

Speaker 3:

Love that.

Speaker 2:

Well, and in true you to be stout students stand out fashion. You both have jobs lined up after you graduate . So you're graduating in may and then Rio. Where are you off to?

Speaker 4:

I have been with Leinenkugel's brewing company since March of last year, so right. I hit my year on St . Patty's day and I'm gonna be working through the summer with them full time and we'll see what happens after that. That's excellent.

Speaker 3:

Congratulations.

Speaker 4:

Free beer and great people and design. Yes, please. What

Speaker 2:

<laugh> hello?

Speaker 4:

Say less . Oh

Speaker 2:

My gosh. Eleanor, what you got going on?

Speaker 5:

Well, that sounds like a lot of fun. Um , I started working with the last flood , um , full time in March. Uh , so I've been there for like a month and a half now. Um, I am a junior environment artist and yeah, I'm working on a secret project. <laugh> Ooh , that's as much as I can say. Um, the MOAs float is , um , recently acquired by , um , CD project and there the studio that made , uh , the Witcher and cyber punk .

Speaker 2:

Wow.

Speaker 3:

So people listening to this, that play video games will know what that means. Oh yeah .

Speaker 2:

Yes . I don't even know what that means.

Speaker 3:

I'm so out of , I embroider at home, listen to audio books . I mean, it's , I love

Speaker 2:

That . That sounds cool.

Speaker 3:

It's not as colorful as I think those might be.

Speaker 2:

Well , certainly we wanna thank you both so much for joining us and sharing all of your wisdom as you've just gone through these two incredible programs and you have amazing futures in store for you. So thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank

Speaker 4:

You guys.

Speaker 5:

Yeah. Thank you for inviting us.

Speaker 2:

We wanna thank both our guests for sharing their stout experie. And if you are interested in either program discussed today, we will link information in the show notes. Rachel , tell our listeners where they can find us.

Speaker 3:

All right . So if listeners have any great ideas or topics that they like to hear on the podcast, you can connect with us on social media, Instagram at UWS out , picks 12 at UW stout and searching university of Wisconsin, stout on Facebook and LinkedIn subscribe to inside stout on apple podcasts, Spotify and Google podcasts. We'll see you next time where we share even more stories that go inside stout.